These three charts are mental models that’ll help you find your next job. This is based on observation and it’s how I’m approaching hiring for Lane (hint for anyone applying for a role!).

Chart #1: Show your trajectory

The trajectory of your career matters more to a smart hiring manager than your current position.

The trajectory of your career matters more to a smart hiring manager than your current position. They want to see not only what you have done but the impact you can have if you join their team.

Interviewers will focus on your experiences to assess the impact you’ll have. You can help them by focusing on your momentum when describing your past. A few simple rules of thumb:

  • Focus on what you learned not what you did.
  • Discuss what you would do differently.
  • Describe how you would apply it to the product you are interviewing for.

Chart #2: Effort always increases chances of getting the job

Effort always increases chances of getting the job

I’m excited to start my day and work with my team to build an amazing product. So it’s only natural that I want you to be excited about joining our team. But here’s the problem: words mean little without action. It’s great to hear your excitement about our product but I also want to see and feel it.

The best way to show your excitement is to spend one of your most valuable resources: time. Any demonstrable increase in time and effort, will have a corresponding increase in the likelihood of you being hired. You can show effort by:

  • Do a deep dive into the product and suggest opportunities.
  • Reach out to the hiring manager, or better yet, getting introduced to the hiring manager through a shared connection.
  • Follow up after every conversation with thoughts and thanking them for their time.

Chart #3: Your ability to apply your skills matter as much as your skills

Your ability to apply your skills matter as much as your skills

It’s important to show the skills and experience you have, but it’s as important to show that you know when to use them. This is also known as the law of the instrument: “if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.”

You are being hired to positively impact the company by using your skills. You are not being hired to execute your skills.